reps

All workers should have access to training and development. ULRs are influential in supporting, developing and improving the learning culture within the workplace.

The ULR role involves raising awareness about the value of learning, helping organise courses in the workplace and supporting and encouraging members to take part in learning.

For more information on the rights of ULRs and union members, see the ACAS Code of Practice - Time off for trade union duties and activities.

Want to become a union learning rep (ULR)?

First discuss it with your union official (for example, branch or shop stewards committee) or your full-time officer. All ULRs are given training for their role through courses provided by TUC Education and individual unions. Take a look at the TUC Education website for training opportunities. 

Common
questions
What is a union learning rep?
A union learning representative (ULR) is a member of an independent trade union, recognised by their employer, and elected by their union in the workplace.
What do ULRs do?
ULRs have been instrumental in championing the importance of training and development. ULRs work very hard to boost the image and strengthen the organisation of their union within the workplace. They can help widen union membership across the board and in underrepresented groups such as migrant workers. The ULR role involves: promoting the value of learning, supporting learners, arranging learning/training, supporting workplace and learning centres to embed learning in the workplace.
How do I become a ULR?
If union members want to become ULRs, they should first discuss it with the relevant workplace structure of their union (for example, branch or shop stewards committee), or their full-time officer. All ULRs are given training for their role through courses provided by TUC Education and individual unions.
What are the rights of a ULR?
The statutory rights for ULRs and union members are: union learning representatives are entitled to reasonable paid time off for training and for carrying out their duties as set out above. Union members are entitled to unpaid time off to consult their learning representative, as long as they belong to a bargaining unit for which the union is recognised.