We all deserve some time off to rest, spend time with family and friends, and enjoy our lives outside work. That’s why almost everyone at work in the UK has a right to paid holiday.

Working people are currently entitled to 5.6 weeks of paid holiday per year, although some employers will offer more than this minimum. So, someone working five days a week gets 28 days of annual leave. But employers can count public holidays and bank holidays towards that total.

If you work part-time, you can figure out how much paid holiday you’re entitled to by multiplying the number of days you work by 5.6. Employers will usually require you to give some notice before you take holiday.

When on holiday, you’re entitled to a week’s pay for each week of holiday, including all the elements of your usual pay (e.g. overtime or commission).

But while you have a right to paid holiday, you unfortunately don’t have an absolute right to choose when you take it. Your employer can refuse your request for holiday at a given time or can tell you when to take your holiday.

Common
questions
How much annual leave am I entitled to by law and when can I take it?
All workers have, from the first day of employment, the right to 5.6 weeks' paid holiday per year...
What rate should my holiday pay be set at?
You are entitled to be paid at the rate of a week's pay in respect of each week of leave...
How do I work out my holiday entitlement?
If you are an employee, your contract of employment should specify your entitlement to annual holidays. This can only be the same as, or better than, the legal minimum explained below.
Can my employer make me take my holidays when they want, rather than when I’d like?
Yes. You don't necessarily have the right to choose when you take your holiday and your employer can tell you when to take your leave.