Tribunal fees have been a “huge victory” for Britain’s worst bosses, says TUC

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Employment tribunal fees have been a huge victory for Britain’s worst bosses, according to a new TUC report published today (Tuesday) to mark the one year anniversary of the new charges.

The report – What Price Justice?– shows how since the introduction of fees in July 2013 there has been a 79 per cent fall in overall claims taken to employment tribunals, with women and low-paid workers the worst affected.

What Price Justice? analyses the latest Ministry of Justice statistics and reveals the following key findings:

• Women are among the biggest losers – there has been an 80 per cent fall in the number of women pursuing sex discrimination claims. Just 1,222 women took out claims between January and March 2014, compared to 6,017 over the same period in 2013. 
The number of women pursuing pregnancy discrimination claims is also down by over a quarter (26 per cent).
• Race and disability claims have plummeted – during the first three months of 2014 the number of race discrimination and sexual orientation claims both fell by 60 per cent compared to the same period in 2013.
Disability claims have experienced a 46 per cent year-on-year reduction.
• Workers are being cheated out of wages – there has been a 70 per cent drop in workers pursuing claims for non-payment of the national minimum wage.
Claims for unpaid wages and holiday pay have fallen overall by 85 per cent. The report says that many people are being put off making a claim, because the cost of going to a tribunal is often more expensive than the sum of their outstanding wages.
• Low-paid workers are being priced out – only 24 per cent of workers who applied for financial assistance to take claims received any form of fee remittance.
Even workers employed on the minimum wage face fees of up to £1,200 if a member of their household has savings of £3,000.
TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said: “Employment tribunal fees have been a huge victory for Britain’s worst bosses.

“By charging up-front fees for harassment and abuse claims the government has made it easier for bad employers to get away with the most appalling behaviour.

“Tribunal fees are part of a wider campaign to get rid of workers’ basic rights. The consequence has been to price low-paid and vulnerable people out of justice.”

- A copy of What Price Justice? can be found at:
- All TUC press releases can be found at
- Follow the TUC on Twitter: @tucnews
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Media enquiries:
Rob Holdsworth    T: 020 7467 1372    M: 07717 531150     E: [email protected]
Tim Nichols   T: 020 7467 1337   M: 07876 452902   E: [email protected]

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