More than 100,000 jobs lost in South West since start of the recession

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date: 10 September 2010

embargo: Immediate release

More than 100,000 jobs have been lost in the South West since employment peaked in the third quarter of 2007, according to research released by the Trades Union Congress.

The number of jobs in the region has fallen by 4 per cent, from 2,719,400 in the third quarter of 2007 to 2,615,000 in the first quarter of 2010 - a loss of 104,400 jobs in total across the South West.

Analysis of Office for National Statistics figures shows employment in the South West peaked ahead of the UK as a whole - meaning the region was hit by job losses six months earlier than the rest of the country.

The analysis, carried out by the TUC ahead of its 142nd annual Congress in Manchester next week, shows a million jobs have been lost across the UK as a whole, thanks to the recession.

UK employment fell by 3 per cent, from 31.78 million in the UK employment peak of the second quarter of 2008 to 30.77 million in the first quarter of 2010. The worst affected industries across the UK as a whole are mining and quarrying (-15 per cent), manufacturing (-12 per cent) and construction (-11 per cent).

The TUC analysis shows if the private sector continues to create jobs at the same rate that it has over the last 10 years, it is likely to take 14 years for UK employment levels to those before the recession struck.

In some regions, such as the North West, it will take more than two decades to make up for the jobs lost in the recession and those to come from public spending cuts. For the South West, the analysis shows it will take at least 11 years for the private sector to return job levels to pre-recession levels.

South West figures

Since the South West employment peak of Q3 2007, the worst affected industries are: construction (-24 per cent); transport & storage (-13 per cent); accommodation & food services (-11 per cent); professional/science (-11 per cent); finance and insurance (-10 per cent);

It's not all bad news: the number of jobs in agriculture, forestry & fishing has increased by 52 per cent since Q3 2007; water supply (+35 per cent); arts and entertainment (+14 per cent); and by 6 per cent each in admin & support services, public administration and real estate.

But overall there's been a drop of 4 per cent since the region's employment peak of Q3 2007.

It will take at least 11 years for the private sector to create enough jobs to return employment levels in the region to pre-recession levels, based on the private sector's growth rate of the last 10 years.

South West TUC Regional Secretary Nigel Costley said: 'These figures show how bad the recession has hit the South West. Behind the big numbers are countless personal stories of upset and loss.

'Valuable skills and experience have gone, good firms have suffered. But we fear worse to come given the savage nature of the cuts that are coming. For every public sector job lost there will be even more gone in the private sector.'

Other findings of the TUC analysis include:

There is a clear north-south divide in the decline in the number of jobs. Scotland, Northern Ireland, the North West and the West Midlands have had the biggest falls in employment (-4 per cent) since Q2 2008.

The South West has seen a -3 per cent fall in employment since Q2 2008 - but when the region's employment peak of Q3 2007 is taken into account, the figures show it has suffered the same rate of job losses (-4 per cent) as the worst performing regions.

The national figures would be far worse were it not for the growth of public sector employment since 2008, particularly in education (+4 per cent) and health and social work (+6 per cent).

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Contacts:

South West TUC Regional Secretary: Nigel Costley - tel: 0117 947 0521

South West TUC media officers:

Susie Weldon - mob: 0797 0466 830; tel: 0117 952 0974

Phil Chamberlain - mob: 077 930 18283; tel: 01225 744006

Email address - southwestmedia@tuc.org.uk

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